KIR & KIR ROYALE

 

Kir reminds us of sojourning in the French-Swiss Borderland (Best Kept Secrets and especially the Off-the-Beaten-Path Sojourn)

Kir Royal made with Crème de Cassis Homemade or from Burgundy

Kir Royal made with Crème de Cassis Homemade or from Burgundy

Kir

1 part Crème de Cassis

4 parts dry white wine

Kir Royale

1 part Crème de Cassis

4 parts *Champagne

* Or a dry sparkling wine

 like Crémant de Bourgogne

The Kir is a common apéritif cocktail throughout France.  When properly made, it is refreshingly fruity, and vaguely sweet. It can be drunk at any time of year but the Kir always reminds me of warm summer days spent in sun-dappled gardens in Eastern France.  A sip of its more elegant cousin, the bubbly Kir Royale, floods my mind with memories of joyful occasions and festive celebrations. The simple recipe uses just two ingredients, both from Burgundy: black current liqueur (Crème de Cassis) and an unexceptional light bodied, crisp white wine (Bourgogne Aligoté). Similar wines can be easily substituted but the original recipe is often considered a brilliant post WWII publicity stunt by the mayor of Dijon, Felix Kir, to promote regional products. Mayor Kir, the drink’s namesake, popularized the cocktail by persistently serving it in fashionable settings, when receiving important guests, and for various celebrations until it became the vogue.

In Eastern France it is often served with a regional specialty called gougères, a kind of homemade cheese puff.  It is a perfect pairing when you want to serve a special hors d’oeuvre!  After you visit Dijon on our Eastern France tour, this recipe will bring back fond memories of the trip.

DIRECTIONS: To get the best blend, pour the Crème de Cassis in the glass first.  When you add the wine/crémant the two liquids will mingle effortlessly.

THE TRIP IS JUST THE BEGINNING OF THE EXPERIENCE

          

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One thought on “KIR & KIR ROYALE

  1. Pingback: 10 Foods to Try in France | Sojourner Tours

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